VETERINARIANS WITHOUT BORDERS

One of the most effective NGO’s-Non Governmental Organization- working on the stray dog issue in the developing world is a group of veterinarians and volunteers called Veterinarians Without Borders.

Have you ever wondered who helps the strays in all under developed third world countries, where there is barely enough food to eat?

Veterinarians Without Borders was founded in 2005 by Canadian vets concerned about the health of people and animals in developing countries.

Jobs available at Veterinarians Without Borders.

Vets Without Borders blog. A great blog .

 

The group formed against the backdrop of worldwide epidemics of zoonotic diseases like SARS, H1N1 avian flu and foot and mouth disease that threatened public health on a global scale. The Victoria-based charity now works in more than a dozen countries in Southeast Asia, Africa and Central and South America. In addition to immunization and sterilization programs, VWB also offers medical care to livestock, and education and training for farmers on how to keep their animals disease-free.

In the Spring of 2012 ,a group of Canadian veterinarians from B.C went to Guatemala.They provided medical care, vaccinations, spaying and neutering for street dogs in Todos Santos.

In many developing countries like Ethiopia and Guatemala ,the welfare of people and animals is interdependent meaning that by improving the health of livestock and small animals , these veterinarians can improve the overall health and hygiene of the communities. Street dogs can be vaccinated against rabies and neutered or spayed and dewormed preventing the transmission of diseases to children and adults within that particular community.

Many veterinarians go on behalf of this nonprofit organization and will bring knowledge, rabies vaccines, deworming meds  and other supplies to places worldwide that are in need of vaccines and meds.

They can be found in many of the poorest countries of the world and help impoverished communities develop safe and healthy food supplies by eliminating some of the most dangerous diseases.

Neutering and vaccinating stray dogs against rabies is an important part of their work today and continuous to be important.

Veterinarians Without Borders advances human health and livelihoods in underserved areas by sustainably improving veterinary care and animal husbandry, working toward preventing, controlling and eliminating priority diseases.

Vision: Enhance human and animal health and create a secure, diverse, and healthy food supply for all the world’s people.

Their Objectives:

  • To be excellent teachers of veterinary service and care measured by their ability to communicate and transfer knowledge that results in the enhancement of veterinary skills in underserved areas;
  •  To be a leading non-profit organization by building global and local capacity in high quality veterinary education, service and care;
  •  To develop and strengthen value chains for the producer and veterinary care providers that improves animal and human health as well as  economic growth.

They accept licenced veterinarians, fourth year veterinary students and lots and lots of volunteers.

“A roving dog without an owner is a danger to society and a swarm of them is a menace to its very existence… If we want to keep dogs in towns or villages in a decent manner no dog should be suffered to wander. There should be no stray dogs even as we have no stray cattle… But can we take individual charge of these roving dogs? Can we have a pinjrapole for them? If both these things are impossible then there seems to me no alternative except to kill them… it is an insult to the starving dog to throw a crumb at him. Roving dogs do not indicate compassion and civilization in society; they betray instead the ignorance and lethargy of its members… that means we should keep them and treat them with respect as we do our companions and not allow them to roam about.” Ghandi

Claudia Bensimoun

©Copyright 2012

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