THE PHARAOH HOUND.EXTRAORDINARY DOGS!

The Pharaoh Hound is one of the oldest known domesticated dogs. His predecessor being the dog-like animal called the “Canis Familaris Leineri.”

The Pharaoh Hound had its origin in ancient Egypt and it is thought that the Pharaoh Hound was brought from Egypt by the Phoenicians when they settled on the Mediterranean islands of Malta and Gozo.

The preservation of the breed can be credited to Malta (and Gozo) where it is known to have existed for over 2,000 years, having survived in its’ purest form.

These dogs have remained unchanged from the original Pharaoh hounds that were  depicted in ancient Egyptian tombs.

Appearance.

Graceful and elegant

Athletic, slender

Skull resembles a blunt wedge

Body longer than its height

Tail down when relaxed

Size

21-25 inched at wither

Coat

Fine and short silky to hard

White marking on chest,toes,tail- tip- center of forehead and bridge of muzzle.

Temperament

Intelligent

Trainable

Playful

An active breed

Sociable with other dogs and people

Affectionate but sometimes shy

Not yappy and bonds wonderfully with people

Health

Sensitive to barbiturate anaesthetics and prone to frostbite when in cold climates.

Life expectancy 12-15 years

Sensitive skin and prone to allergies with certain shampoos.

Very little shedding

Active like greyhounds but not hyperactive

Strong prey drive and independent

AKC recognized in 1983.

C.B

© Copyright 2012

AFRICAN VILLAGE DOGS AND GENE DIVERSITY. CORNELL-BASED .

AFRICAN VILLAGE DOGS AND GENE DIVERSITY. CORNELL-BASED VILLAGE DOG GENETIC DIVERSITY PROJECT.

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Research from Cornell has shown that African village dogs are not a mixture of modern breeds but have directly descended from an ancestral pool of indigenous dogs.

Author Adam Boyko, a research associate in the lab of Carlos Bustamante says that “ the genes of modern breeds all cluster together in one little group, but the African village dogs show a much greater diversity genetically.”

Three hundred eighteen village dogs from Egypt, Uganda and Namibia were used in this project.

Breed dogs from Africa,Puerto Rico and mixed dogs from the US were also looked at.Weight,age,coat color and body measurements were collected and blood samples sent for analysis to the Canine DNA Bank at the Baker Institute for Animal Health,which is part of Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

With a computer programme,they tracked genetic diversity in the samples and found that the African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa and non-native mixed breed dogs.Breeds such as the Pharoah hounds and Rhodesian ridgebacks were clustered with the non-native breeds, suggesting that they originated from outside Africa.

A previous study of genetics and village dogs has confirmed that domesticated dogs likely originated from Eurasian wolves some 15,000 to 40,000 years ago and that the East Asian village dogs had more genetic diversity than any others used in genetic diversity testing.However, the African village dogs used in the Cornell testing indicate interestingly enough that African village dogs have similar genetic diversity .This raises doubt then as to initial claims that dogs were first domesticated in East Asia.

C.B

© Copyright 2012

THE BASENJI. THE DOG WITHOUT A BARK! HOUND BREED.

Common NamesImage  Basenji, African Bush Dog, African Barkless Dog, Ango Angari, Avuvi, Congo Dog, Zande

Dog Breed Type:  The Basenji is a hound breed. They originated as hunting dogs, and are still used for hunting in Africa.

Background:  The Basenji originated in Africa, where it was a favorite of Egyptian pharaohs. The breed wasn’t successfully brought to England until the 1930s, and was then introduced to the United States. Most Western Basenjis are descended from the original imports, but more were imported from Africa in the 1980s to increase the gene pool.

The Basenji  known for its hunting prowess , is full of energy and playfulness.Being short coated, grooming is easy and most kennels place this breed in the hound group.They howl and yodel and lack the bark of the ‘original dog’.This breeds original stock foundation comes from the Congo Basin.

APPEARANCE

Basenji are small, elegant-looking, short-haired dogs with erect ears, a tightly curled tail and a graceful neck. A basenji’s forehead is wrinkled, especially when the animal is young or extremely old. Basenji eyes are typically almond-shaped, which gives the dog the appearance of squinting .

The Basenji is an alert dog that can be affectionate, energetic, curious and reserved with strangers. This breed can also be  speedy, frisky, tireless at play and wanting to play all the time. The Basenji,although aloof, sometimes forms strong bonds with people and often becomes emotionally attached to those closest to him. Basenjis may not get along with non-canine pets, since they are known for their hunting skills and have a high prey drive.
HEALTH
Many Basenjis suffer from PRA (progressive retinal atrophy), which causes blindness, and Fanconi syndrome, which can cause kidney failure. Besides Fanconi Syndrome and PRA, Basenjis also suffer from Hypothyroidism, IPSID (immunoproliferative systemic intestinal disease), and HA (Hemolytic Anemia). Basenjis are also sensitive to environmental and household chemicals which can cause liver problems.They also suffer from skin allergies.
Fanconi syndrome is an inheritable disorder in which the kidneys fail to reabsorb electrolytes and nutrients.
C.B
© Copyright 2012

SICHUAN TO TIBET! STRAY DOG FINDS A NEW HOME .

CHINESE STRAY RUNS 1,100 MILES WITH CYCLISTS AND ADOPTS A NEW OWNER

Xiaosa or Little Sa joined a group of cyclists in China  after being fed by one of them and was among the three finalists that completed the race. This spunky  street dog also adopted a new owner,the cyclist that he followed.

This stray covered 1,200- miles in 25 days and climbed 12 mountains , some as high as 14,000 feet,whilst in the race.She fended off other dogs and although tired, kept up the whole way .

On her return back to Sichuan, her newly adopted cyclist flew her back  since dogs are not allowed on trains in China.He took the train.She was taken to the veterinarian and received a clean bill of health.

Such an awesome video! Enjoy!

C.B

© Copyright 2012

THE BENEFITS OF KELP/SEAWEED FOR YOUR DOGS

BENEFITS OF KELP/SEAWEED FOR DOGS

We’ve all been through it, over and over. Is this good for my dog?

Have you noticed that more dog parents are giving their furry friends more healthier foods and supplements?

Seaweed or kelp is a sea vegetable which is also known as dulse.It is found in abundance in the north Atlantic.

Benefits of Seaweed

Kelp can help balance the thyroid because of the natural iodine found in the sea vegetable , it works on the thyroid to help regulate it.

Large dogs often have thyroid problems,especially labs and setters.

Kelp helps strengthen the heart as it is high in iron and enriches the blood.Seaweed also prevents toxic metal absorption in dogs.

Kelp is also great for helping with your dog’s digestion and is used as a digestive aid .It keeps the digestive juices balanced and provides great acidic levels.

The iodine in kelp/seaweed helps to strengthen the whole digestive system.

Kelp or seaweed is either available as a kelp powder or supplement and  adds an additional benefit, great shiny coats ,stronger teeth and nails.It also promotes more milk in lactating dogs and helps with weight gain for dogs that have difficulty gaining weight.

Is Spirulina Seaweed?

No! Many people confuse the two.

Spirulina, a common name for human and animal food supplements  is produced primarily from two species of cyanobacteria: Arthrospira platensis, and Arthrospira maxima.

Best Places For Seaweed Shopping

Veggiepets.com

Auravita.com

C.B

©Copyright

HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL

Humane Society International is one of the only international animal protection organizations in the world working to protect all animals—including animals in laboratories, farm animals, companion animals, and wildlife—and their record of achievement demonstrates their awesome dedication and effectiveness.

They are the international division of The Humane Society of the United States and are funded by over 10 million supporters worldwide.

From teaching catching and handling techniques in training workshops both in the classroom and on the field, they address issues ranging from bullfighting to the dog meat trade.

Activities.

Bullfighting

Dog Meat Trade

Fur

Horse Slaughter

Animal Testing

Protecting Seals

Protecting street dogs and all animals

Stopping Puppy Mills

Wildlife Abuse

Give Support to animals in disaster areas

Anti Whaling

Protection of turtles, albatrosses, threatened fish species

Protection of natural habitat

Countries

Central and South America

Africa

Asia

Australia

Europe

THE HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL works together with all governments, humane organizations and individual animal protectionists in over 35 countries to find practical solutions to common animal problems and to educate and inculcate respect and compassion for all life.

C.B

WORLD VETS-INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL AID ORGANIZATION

WORLD VETS                     

This organization, which is similar to Vets Without Borders, travels the world and provides international animal aid-veterinary assistance. This is a group that consists of veterinarians, animal health technicians and veterinary students. They have sent teams down to Haiti and many countries that have suffered natural disasters. They provide vaccines; veterinary medications, equipment and many other much needed relief supplies.

World Vets focuses on education and public health and educate people about zoonotic diseases, which are diseases that are carried by animals and transmitted to humans and from humans to animals.

In my previous blog, I discussed Vets Without Borders and you may be wondering if these two animal aid groups differ in any way. The models differ in that WORLD VETS aims at building long term sustainable relationships with partner countries. They work together with health authorities and community leaders so as to educate the public in these countries. It is a volunteer organization that largely depends on donations and each of the veterinarians; techs and students pay for their own travel expenses .

Most animals in third world countries do not receive the care needed.These animal aid groups help educate people about vaccinations,animal health and donate much needed medical assistance during times of war and natural disasters

Claudia Bensimoun

©Copyright 2012