COUNTRIES THAT BAN PIT BULLS. PETA ON PIT BULLS.

COUNTRIES THAT BAN PIT BULLS

Many foreign countries have enacted breed-specific laws to protect citizens from dangerous dogs and to stop the importation of fighting dogs (pit bulls). Countries DogsBite.org has  included, but are not limited to: Argentina, Bavaria, Bermuda, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Guyana, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Lativa, Singapore, Spain, St. Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, the UAE, United Kingdom, Venezuela and parts of Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia, China and Japan.There are a few more countries where this ban is still pending,but what does it mean for the pit bulls that are in homes already?Do they get taken away and euthanized like Lennox?Do more pit bulls and mixes get placed in already full shelters also to get euthanized?What if all pit bull parents became more hands on and attended mandatory training and obedience classes breed specific for pits .I have known pits that are wonderful family dogs.Given the right environment, mental stimulation ,exercise,training and love, i am sure that many of you would agree, that breed specific discrimination is not only awful and cruel, but serves no purpose whatsoever.Any breed of dog without training,exercise and love ,will eventually end up having behavioral problems.

FOR THE LOVE OF PET BULLS! 

PETA ON PIT BULLS

Real Pit Bull

PIT BULL BANS-BREED SPECIFIC STATES

Pit Bull Bans: The State of Breed–Specific Legislation

Claudia Bensimoun

© Copyright 2012 

2 thoughts on “COUNTRIES THAT BAN PIT BULLS. PETA ON PIT BULLS.

  1. It was only a few years ago the the Maltese was listed on the New South Wales Dangerous Dogs Table. A few adverse reports and there you are, it’s a dangerous dog.

  2. Thanks for writing and publishing this. Most dogs seek safety, a natural form of self preservation. People continue to be the most dangerous animal on the planet and dogs are one of the few species that live with us inside of their “fight or flight zone.” Dogs look to us for safety. If we do not provide them guidance and do not let them run or hide when they feel fearful, they will bite.

    I adopted a biter from an animal shelter. A one-year-old 13 lb. poodle mix who acted pretty mixed up. We sorted him out and his one happy camper, no more biting vets and groomers (or us).

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